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大学英语精读第三册课文朗读

时间:2016-05-31 来源:唯才教育网 本文已影响

篇一:大学英语精读3课文(第三版) 中英文对照

Text Book 3

Unit 1

Text

A young man finds that strolling along the streets without an obvious purpose can lead to trouble with the law. One misunderstanding leads to another until eventually he must appear in court for trial……

一个青年发现,在大街上毫无明显目的地游逛会招致警方的责罚。 误会一个接一个发生,最终他只得出庭受审……

A Brush with the Law

与警察的一场小冲突

I have only once been in trouble with the law. 我平生只有一次跟警方发生纠葛。

The whole process of being arrested and taken to court was a rather unpleasant experience at the time, but it makes a good story now. 被捕和出庭的整个过程在当时是一件非常不愉快的事,但现在倒成了一篇很好的故事。

What makes it rather disturbing was the arbitrary circumstances both of my arrest and my subsequent fate in court. 这次经历令人可恼之处在于围绕着我的被捕以及随后庭上审讯而出现的种种武断专横的情况。

It happened in February about twelve years ago. 事情发生在大约12年前,其时正是2月。 I had left school a couple of months before that and was not due to go to university until the following October. 几个月前我中学毕业了,但上大学要等到10月。

I was still living at home at the time. 当时我还在家中居住。

One morning I was in Richmond, a suburb of London near where I lived. 一天早晨,我来到里士满。这里是伦敦的一个郊区,离我住的地方不远。

I was looking for a temporary job so that I could save up some money to go travelling. 我在寻找一份临时工作,以便积些钱去旅游。

As it was a fine day and I was in no hurry, I was taking my time, looking in shop windows, strolling in the park, and sometimes just stopping and looking around me. 由于天气晴朗,当时又无急事,我便慢悠悠看看橱窗,逛逛公园。有时干脆停下脚步,四处张望。

It must have been this obvious aimlessness that led to my downfall. 现在看来,一定是这种明显的毫无目的的游逛,使我倒了霉。

It was about half past eleven when it happened. 事情发生在11点半钟光景。

I was just walking out of the local library, having unsuccessfully sought employment there, when I saw a man walking across the road with the obvious intention of talking to me. 我在当地图书馆谋职未成,刚刚走出来,便看到一个人穿越马路,显然是要来跟我说话。

I thought he was going to ask me the time. Instead, he said he was a police officer and he was arresting me. 我以为他要问我时间,不料他说他是警官,要逮捕我。

At first I thought it was some kind of joke. But then another policeman appeared, this time in uniform, and I was left in no doubt. 起先我还以为这是在开玩笑,但又一个警察出现在我的面前,这次是位身着警服的,这一下使我确信无疑了。

'But what for?' I asked. “为什么要抓我?”我问道。

"Wandering with intent to commit an arrestable offence,' he said. “到处游荡,企图作案,”他说。 'What offence?' I asked. “作什么案?”我又问。

'Theft,' he said. “偷窃,”他说。

'Theft of what?' I asked. “偷什么?”我追问。

'Milk bottles,' he said, and with a perfectly straight face too! “牛奶瓶,”他板着面孔说道。 'Oh,' I said. “噢,”我说。

It turned out there had been a lot of petty thefts in the area, particularly that of stealing milk bottles from doorsteps. 事情原来是这样的,在这一地区多次发生小的扒窃案,特别是从门前台阶上偷走牛奶瓶。

Then I made my big mistake. 接着,我犯了一个大错误。

At the time I was nineteen, had long untidy hair, and regarded myself as part of the sixties' 'youth countercultrue. 其时我年方19,留一头蓬乱的长发,自认为是60年代“青年反主流文化”的一员。

As a result, I want to appear cool and unconcerned with the incident, so I said, 'How long have you been following me?' in the most casual and conversational tone I could manage. 所以我想装出一副冷漠的、对这一事件满不在乎的样子。于是我尽量用一种漫不经心的极其随便的腔调说,“你们跟踪我多久啦?”

I thus appeared to them to be quite familiar with this sort of situation, and it confirmed them in their belief that I was a thoroughly disreputable character. 这样一来,在他们眼里,我就像是非常熟悉这一套的了,也使他们更加确信我是一个地地道道的坏蛋。

A few minutes later a police car arrived. 几分钟后,开来了一辆警车。

'Get in the back," they said. 'Put your hands on the back of the front seat and don't move them.' “坐到后面去,”他们说。“把手放到前排座位的靠背上,不准挪动。”

They got in on either side of me. It wasn't funny any more. 他们分别坐在我的两边。这可再也不是闹着玩的了。

At the police station they questioned me for several hours. 在警察局,他们审讯了我好几个小时。

I continued to try to look worldly and au fait with the situation. 我继续装成老于世故、对这种事习以为常。

When they asked me what I had been doing, I told them I'd been looking for a job. 当他们问我在干什么时,我告诉他们在找工作。

'Aha,' I could see them thinking, 'unemployed'. “啊,”我可以想象他们在想,“果然是个失业的家伙。”

Eventually, I was officially charged and told to report to Richmond Magistrates' Court the following Monday. Then they let me go. 最后,我被正式起诉,并通知我下周一到里士满地方法庭受审。随后他们让我离开。

I wanted to conduct my own defence in court, but as soon as my father found out what had happened, he hired a very good solicitor. 我想在法庭上作自我辩护,但父亲知道这事后,马上请了一位高明的律师。

We went along that Monday armed with all kinds of witnesses, including my English teacher from school as a character witness. 我们星期一出庭的时候,带了各种各样的证人,其中包括我中学的英语老师,做我人品的见证人。

But he was never called on to give evidence. My 'trial' didn't get that far. 但结果法庭没有叫他作证。我的“审判”没有进行到那一步。

The magistrate dismissed the case after fifteen minutes. 开庭15分钟,法官就驳回了对我的指控。

I was free. The poor police had never stood a chance. 我无罪获释。可怜的警方一点儿赢的机会都没有。

The solicitor even succeeded in getting costs awarded against the police. 我的律师甚至让法庭责成警方承担了诉讼费用。

And so I do not have a criminal record. 这样,我的履历上没有留下犯罪的记录。

But what was most shocking at the time was the things my release from the charge so clearly depended on. 但当时最令人震惊的,是那些显然导致宣布我无罪的证据。

I had the 'right' accent, respectable middle-class parents in court, reliable witnesses, and I could obviously afford a very good solicitor. 我讲话的口音“表明我教养良好”,到庭的有体面的中产阶级的双亲,有可靠的证人,还有,我显然请得起一名很好的律师。

Given the obscure nature of the charge, I feel sure that if I had come from a different background, and had really been unemployed, there is every chance that I would have been found guilty. 从对我指控的这种捕风捉影的做法来看,我肯定,如果我出身在另一种背景的家庭里,并且真的是失了业的话,我完全可能被判有罪。

While asking for costs to be awarded, my solicitor's case quite obviously revolved around the fact that I had a 'brilliant academic record'. 当我的律师要求赔偿诉讼费时,他公然把辩护的证据建立在我“学业优异”这一事实上。

Meanwhile, just outside the courtroom, one of the policemen who had arrested me was gloomily complaining to my mother that another youngster had been turned against the police. 与此同时,就在审判室外面,一位抓我的警察正在沮丧地向我母亲抱怨,说是又一个小伙子要跟警察作对了。

'You could have been a bit more helpful when we arrested you,' he said to me reproachfully. 他带着责备的口气对我说,“我们抓你的时候,你本可以稍微帮点忙的。”

What did he mean? 他说这话什么意思?

Presumably that I should have looked outraged and said something like, 'Look here, do you know who you're talking to? I am a highly successful student with a brilliant academic record. How dare you arrest me!'大概是说我本该显出愤愤不平的样子,并说,“喂,留神点,你知道你在跟谁说话?我是学业出众的高材生。你敢抓我!”

Then they, presumably, would have apologized, perhaps even taken off their caps, and let me on my way. 那样一来,他们或许会向我道歉,说不定还会脱帽致意,让我走开呢。

NEW WORDS

brush

n. brief fight or encounter 小冲突;小接触

process

n. course; method, esp. one used in manufacture 过程;制作法

arbitrary

a. based on one's own opinion only, not on reason 任意的;武断的

circumstance

n. (usu. pl.) conditions, facts, etc. connected with an event or person 情况,环境

subsequent

a. following, later 随后的,接下去的

fate

n. what will happen or happened to sb. or sth. 命运

due

a. expected; supposed (to) 预期的;约定的;到期的

temporary

a. lasting only for a limited time 暂时的

stroll

a. walk at leisure 散步,闲逛

obvious

a. easily seen or understood; clear 明显的,显而易见的

downfall

n. ruin 垮台;衰落

employment

n. one's regular work or occupation; job 职业;工作

wander

vi. move about without a purpose 闲逛;漫游

commit

vt. do (sth. wrong, bad, or unlawful)干(坏事),犯(错误、罪)

arrestable

a. deserving to be arrested

offence (AmE offense)

n. crime; the hurting of feelings; something unpleasant 罪行;冒犯;不愉快的事 straight face

a face or expression that shows no emotion, humor, or thought 板着的脸

petty

a. small; unimportant 小的;不足道的

doorstep

n. a step in front of a door

regard

vt. consider in the stated way 把??看作;把认为(as)

counterculture

n. a culture, esp. of the young who oppose the traditional standards and customs of their society 反主流文化

unconcerned

a. not worried; untroubled; indifferent 无忧虑的;淡漠的

casual

a. careless; informal 漫不经心的,随便的

conversational

a. of or commonly used in talking 会话(用)的

confirm

vt. make certain; support 证实,肯定;确定

belief

n. something believed; trust 相信;信念;信仰

thoroughly

ad. completely; in every way 完全地,彻底地

thorough a.

disreputable

a. having or showing a bad character; having a bad name 声名狼籍的

worldly

a. experienced in the ways of society 老于世故的

au fait

a. (F) familiar 熟悉的;精通的

aha

int. a cry of surprise, satisfaction, etc. 啊哈!

magistrate

n. civil officer acting as a judge in the lowest courts 地方法官

conduct

vt. direct the course of; manage 处理;主持;引导;指挥

defence (AmE defense)

n. the act of defending in court the person who has been charged 辨护

solicitor

n. (esp. in Britain) lawyer who advises clients on legal matters and speaks on their behalf in lower courts (初级)律师

witness

n. a person who gives evidence in a court of law; sth. serving as evidence or proof 证人;证据 trial

n. the act or fact of examining and deciding a civil or criminal case by a law court 审判 dismiss

vt. (of a judge) stop (a court case) 驳回,对??不予受理

cost

n. (pl.) the cost of having a matter settled in a law court. esp. that paid to the winning party by the losing party 诉讼费

award

vt. give by a decision in court of law; give or grant by an official decision 判给;授予

accent

n. way of speaking typical of the natives or residents of a region, or of any other group 口音;腔调

respectable

a. deserving respect 值得尊敬的

reliable

a. that may be relied or depended upon 可靠的,可信赖的

given

prep. taking into account; if allowed or provided with 考虑到;假定

obscure

a. not clearly seen or understood 模糊的;晦涩的

guilty

a. having broken a law; showing or feeling that one has done wrong 有罪的;内疚的 revolve

v. (cause to) go round in a circle (使)旋转

brilliant

篇二:大学英语精读第三册课文翻译

Unit 1

一个年轻人发现,在街上漫无目的的闲逛也会带来涉及法律上的麻烦。一种误解导致另一种误解,直到最终他必须在法庭上接受审判…….

法律小冲突

我平生只有一次陷入与法律的冲突。被捕与被带上法庭的整个经过在当时是一种令人极不愉快的经历,但现在这却成为一个好故事的素材。尤其令人恼怒的是我被捕及随后在法庭上受审期间的种种武断情形。

事情发生在十二年前的二月,那是我中学毕业已经几个月了,但是要等到十月份才能上大学,所以当时我仍在家中。

一天上午,我来到离我住地不远的伦敦郊区的里士满,那是我正在找一份临时的工作,一边攒些钱去旅游。由于天体晴朗,有没有什么急事,我便悠然自得的看看窗店橱窗,逛逛公园,有时干脆停下来四处观望。一定是这种显然无所事事的样子使我倒了霉。

事情发生在十一点半左右,当我在当地图书馆谋之未成,刚从那里出来,就看见一个人从马路对面走过来,显然是想跟我说话。我愿意为他是要问我时间。想不到他说他是警察,要逮捕我。开始我还以为这是个玩笑。但紧接着又来了一个穿着警服的警察,这下我无可置疑了。

“为什么抓我?”我问。

“四处游荡,有作案嫌疑,”他说。

“做什么案?”我又问。

“偷东西,” 他说。

“偷什么”我追问。

“牛奶瓶”他说,表情极端严肃。

“噢,”

事情是这样的,这一带经常发生小偷小摸的案件,尤其是从门前台阶上偷走牛奶瓶。

接着,我犯了个大错误,那是我才十九岁,留着一头乱蓬蓬的长发,自以为是六十年代“青年反主流文化”的一员。因此,我想对此表现出一副冷漠,满不在乎的态度,于是用一种很随便的无所谓的腔调说:“你们跟我多久了?”这样一来,我在他们眼里,我是惯于此种情形的,这又使他们确信我是一个彻头彻尾的坏蛋。

几分钟后来了一辆警车。

“坐到后面去,”他们说:“把手放在椅背上,不许乱动。”他俩分别坐在我的左右,这下可不是闹着玩的了。

在警察局,他们审问了我好几个小时。我继续装着老于世故,对此种事习以为常的样子。当他们问我一直在干什么事时,我告诉他们我在找工作。“啊哈”,这下我可看到他们在想,“无业游民”。

最后,我被正式指控,并得到通知下周一到里士满地方法院受审。他们这才让我走。

我本想在法庭上自我辩护,但是父亲一弄清事情原委后,就为我请了一位很不错的律师。就在那个星期一,我们带着各种证人出庭了,

这其中包括我的中学英语教师作为我的平行见证人。但法庭没有传唤他作证。对我的“审判”并没有进行到那一步,才开庭十五分钟,法官就驳回了此案。我被无罪释放。可怜的警察毫无胜诉的机会。我的律师甚至成功的使警察承担了诉讼费。

这样, 我没有留下任何犯罪记录。但当时,最令人震惊的是我被无罪释放所明显依赖的证据:我有标准的口音,有受人尊重的中产阶级父母来到法庭,有可靠的证人,还有,很明显我请得起很好的律师。想到这次指控的含混不清的特点,我敢断定,我如果出生在一个不同背景的家庭,并真失了业,则完全可能被判为有罪。当我的律师要求赔偿诉讼费时,他的辩词很显然的紧紧围绕着我“学习成绩优异”这一事实。

与此同时,在法庭外面,曾逮捕我的警察中的一个沮丧的想我的母亲抱怨说,又有一个小伙子要与警察做对了。他以责备的口气对我说:“我们抓你的时候,你本可以帮帮忙的。”

他这话是什么意思?也许是说我因该做出大发雷霆的样子,并说:“喂,你们知道是在和谁说话么?我是品学兼优的高材生。你们怎么敢抓我?”那样的话,他们也许会向我道歉,可能还会脱帽致意,让我扬长而去。

Unit 2

不愿告发的女人

“我从不憎恨过北方佬。我所恨的是战争…… “

我的姨婆贝蒂总是这样讲述她的故事。我小时候就多次听过她的故事。那时,她住在维吉尼亚利威尔的一所老房子里,每当我们一家人去看望她时,她总是要讲这个故事。他当时已近八十岁了,但我能想像出她在故事中的样子-------刚满二十岁,年轻漂亮,还有一双清澈漂亮的蓝眼睛。

贝蒂.范..米特有充分的理由憎恨那场内战,她的一个兄弟在葛底斯堡阵亡,另一个做了俘虏。接着他年轻的丈夫詹姆斯----南部联邦的一名军官------也被俘虏,关到一个不为人知的俘虏营里了。

九月下旬的一天,天气炎热,贝蒂家以前的奴隶迪克朗纳来向她讲述一件奇怪的事情。他在查看离范。米特家半英里处的一所农舍时本以为农舍房子是空的,但是却传来农舍里传来低低的呻吟声,他循着声音到了顶楼,发现了一个受伤的联邦政府士兵,身边还放着一支步枪。

贝蒂婆姨向我讲述她第一眼看到那个满脸胡须,穿着血迹斑斑的蓝制服的人时,她总是说:“就像人走入了一场噩梦:可怕的绷带,令人恶心的气味。孩子,那是战争真正的面目:没有军号没有战旗。有的只是痛苦和污秽,徒劳和死亡。”

在贝蒂.范.米特的眼里,这个人不是敌人,而是遭难的同胞。她为他水喝,并尽力擦净他那可怕的伤口。然后走出农舍,到外面呼吸一下新鲜的空气,他依靠着农舍想到所看到的情景------那只打烂的右

手,失掉了的左腿-----尽量控制着自己不呕吐出来。

贝蒂在顶楼上发现了这个人的证件,证实了他的身份:第十一费蒙特志愿军连中尉亨利.比德尔,三十岁。她知道应向南部联邦军队报告这个联邦政府军官的情况,但她也知道她不会那样做的。她是这样向我解释的:我不断地想他是不是在什么地方有一个妻子,正等着他,期盼他归去,却又一直杳无音信----就像我一样。对我来说,唯一重要的是使他的丈夫回到她的身边”

詹姆斯.范.米特的妻子慢慢的,耐心的,巧妙地点燃了亨利比德尔身上奄奄一息的生命的火花。她几乎没有任何药物,又不愿意从南部联邦医院那极少的供给中去拿。但是她倾其所有进了自己最大的努力去帮助他。

当比德尔的身体恢复了一些时,他向贝蒂讲述了他在佛蒙特的维斯菲尔德的妻子和女儿的情况。比德尔也倾听她讲述他的兄弟和丈夫詹姆斯的事。“我知道他的妻子一定在为她祷告,”贝蒂婆姨对我说:“就像我为詹姆斯祷告一样。我感觉和比德尔的妻子很亲近,这真是奇怪。”

十月山谷的夜晚已经很冷了,比德尔的伤口感染恶化了起来,在迪克和他妻子的帮助下,贝蒂趁着黑夜将这位联邦政府军官搬到她家里温暖的厨房上面的一个不易发现的阁楼上。

但第二天,比德尔发起了高烧。贝蒂知道他必须找人帮忙,否则他会死掉,于是她去找她的家庭医生,也是多年的好友格雷厄姆.奥斯本。

篇三:大学英语精读第三册课文翻译

第一课

与法律的小摩擦

我平生只有一次跟警方发生纠葛。被捕和出庭的整个过程在当时是一件非常不愉快的事,但现在倒成了一篇很好的故事。这次经历令人可恼之处在于围绕着我的被捕以及随后庭上审讯而出现的种种武断专横的情况。

I have only once been in trouble with the law. The whole process of being arrested and taken to court(法院) was a rather unpleasant experience at the time, but it makes a good story now. What makes it rather disturbing was the arbitrary circumstances both of my arrest(来自:WWw.hn1c.com 唯 才教 育 网:大学英语精读第三册课文朗读) and my subsequent fate in court.

事情发生在大约12年前,其时正是2月。几个月前我中学毕业了,但上大学要等到10月。当时我还在家中居住。

It happened in February about twelve years ago. I had left school a couple of months before that and was not due to go to university until the following October. I was still living at home at the time.

一天早晨,我来到里士满。这里是伦敦的一个郊区,离我住的地方不远⊙我在寻找一份临时工作,以便积些钱去旅游。由于天气晴朗,当时又无急事,我便慢悠悠看看橱窗,逛逛公园。有时千脆停下脚步,四处张望。现在看来,一定是这种明显的毫无回的的游逛,使我倒了霉。 One morning I was in Richmond, a suburb of London near where I

lived. I was looking for a temporary job so that I could save up some money

to go traveling. As it was a fine day and I was in no hurry, I was taking

my time, looking in shop windows, strolling in the park, and sometimes

just stopping and looking around me. It must have been this obvious aim-

lessness that led to my downfall.

事情发生在11点半钟光景。我在当地图书馆谋职未成,刚刚走出来,便看到一个人穿越马路,显然是要来跟我说话。我以为他要问我时间,不料他说他是警官,要逮捕我。起先我还以为这是在开玩笑,但又一个警察出现在我的面前,这次是位身着警服的,这一下使我确信无疑了。

It was about half past eleven when it happened. I was just walking out

of the local library, having unsuccessfully sought employment there, when

I saw a man walking across the road with the obvious intention of talking

to me. I thought he was going to ask me the time. Instead, he said he was

a police officer and he was arresting me. At first I thought it was some

kind of joke. But then another policeman appeared, this time in uniform, and

was left in no doubt.

“为什么要抓我?”我问道。

“到处游荡,企图作案,”他说。

“作什么案?”我又问。

“偷窃,”他说。

“偷什么?”我追问。

“牛奶瓶,”他板着面孔说道。

“噢,”我说。

事情原来是这样的,在这一地区多次发生小的扒窃案,特别是从门前台阶上偷走牛奶瓶。 It turned out there had been a lot of petty thefts in the area,

particularly that of stealing milk bottles from doorsteps.

接着,我犯了一个大错误。其时我年方19,留一头蓬乱的长发,自认为是60年代“青年反主流文化”的一员。所以我想装出一副冷漠的、对这一事件满不在乎的样子。于是我尽量用一种漫不经心的极其随便的腔调说,“你们跟踪我多久啦?”这样一来,在他们眼里,我就像是非常熟悉这一套的了,也使他们更加确信我是一个地地道道的坏蛋。

Then I made my big mistake. At the time I was nineteen, had long

untidy hair, and regarded myself as part of the sixties'` youth counterculture'.

As a result, I wanted to appear cool and unconcerned with the incident, so

I said, ` How long have you 'been following me?' in the most casual and

conversational tone I could manage. I thus appeared to them to be quite

familiar with this sort of situation, and it confirmed them in their belief that

I was a thoroughly disreputable character.

几分钟后,开来了一辆警车。

“坐到后面去,”他们说。“把手放到前排座位的靠背上,不准挪动。”

他们分别坐在我的两边。这可再也不是闹着玩的了。

在警察局,他们审讯了我好几个小时。我继续装成老于世故、对这种事习以为常。当他们问我在千什么时,我告诉他们在找工作。“啊,”我可以想见他们在想,“果然是个失业的家伙。” At the police station they questioned me for several hours. I continued

to try to look worldly and au fait with the situation. When they asked me

what I had been doing, I told them I'd been looking for a job. ` Aha, ' I

could see them thinking, `unemployed '.

最后,我被正式指控,并通知我下周一到里士满地方法庭受审。随后他们让我离开。

我想在法庭上作自我辩护,但父亲知道这事后,马上请了一位高明的律师。我们星期一出庭的时候,带了各种各样的证人,其中包括我中学的英语老师,作我人品的见证人。但结果法庭没有叫他作证。我的“审判”没有进行到那一步。开庭1 5分钟,法官就驳回了对我的指控。我无罪获释。可怜的警方败诉,我的律师甚至让法庭责成警方承担了诉讼费用。 I wanted to conduct my own defense in court, but as soon as my father

found out what had happened, he hired a very good solicitor. We went

along that Monday armed with all kinds of witnesses, including my English

teacher from school as a character witness. But he was never called on to

give evidence. My `trial' didn't get that far. The magistrate dismissed the

case after fifteen minutes. I was free. The poor police had never stood a

chance. The solicitor even succeeded in getting costs awarded against the

police.

这样,我的履历上没有留下犯罪的记录。但当时最令人震惊的,是那些显然导致宣布我无罪的证据。我讲话的口音“表明我受过良好教养”,到庭的有体面的中产阶级的双亲,有可靠的证人,还有,我显然请得起一名很好的律师。从对我指控的这种捕风捉影的做法来看,我肯定,如果我出身在另一种背景的家庭里,并且真的是失了业的话,我完全可能被判有罪。当我的律师要求赔偿诉讼费时,他公然把辩护的证据建立在我“学业优异”这一事实上。 And so I do not have a criminal record. But what was most shocking at

the time was the things my release from the charge so clearly depended on.

I had the `right' accent, respectable middle-class parents in court, reliable

witnesses, and I could obviously afford a very good solicitor. Given the obscure

nature of the charge, I feel sure that if I had come from a different background,

and had really been unemployed, there is every chance that I would have

been found guilty. While asking for costs to be awarded, my solicitor's case

quite obviously revolved around the fact that I had a 'brilliant academic

record' .

与此同时,就在审判室外面,一位抓我的警察正在沮丧地向我母亲抱怨,说是又一个小伙子要跟警察作对了。他带着责各的口气对我说,“我们抓你的时候,你本可以稍微帮J点忙的。” Meanwhile, just outside the courtroom, one of the policemen who had

arrested me was gloomily complaining to my mother that another youngster

had been turned against the police. 'You could have been a bit more helpful

when we arrested you,' he said to me reproachfully.

他说这话什么意思?大概是说我本该显出愤愤不平的样子,并说,“喂,留神,点,你知道你在跟谁说话?我是学业出众的高材生。你敢抓我!”那样一来,他们或许会向我道歉,说不定还会脱帽致意,让我走开呢。

What did he mean? Presumably that I should have looked outraged and said

something like, ' Look here, do you know who you're talking to? I am a highly

successful student with a brilliant academic record. How dare you arrest me!'

Then they, presumably, would have apologized, perhaps even taken off

their caps, and let me on my way.

第二单元

不肯告发的女人

“我从来就不恨北方佬,我所恨的只是战争??”

我的姨婆贝蒂一讲起她的故事来,总是用这样的话开头。她的故事,在我还小的时候就听过多遍。姨婆住在弗吉尼亚贝利维尔一所旧房子里。每逢我们一家去看望她,她都要讲讲她的故事,那时姨婆贝蒂都快80岁了。但我可以想象到故事里她的容貌——刚刚20岁,长着一双亮晶晶的蓝眼睛,非常漂亮。

贝蒂?范?米特完全有理由憎恨内战。她有个兄弟死在葛底斯堡战场上,还有一位当了俘虏。接着,她年轻的丈夫詹姆斯——南部邦联的一名军官——也被俘虏,关到某地一所不为人知的俘虏营里。

9月下旬的一个热天,贝蒂家以前的奴隶迪克?朗纳来到贝蒂处,告诉她一件奇怪的事。他在察看离范?米特家半英里处的一所农舍时,本以为那是所空房子,但在屋里,他听到有人低声呻吟。他随着呻吟声来到顶楼,发现了一名受伤的联邦政府士兵,在他的身边放着一支步枪。

贝蒂姨婆跟我讲起她第一次看到那个身着污渍斑斑的蓝军服、长着胡须的人时,她总是说,“我就像步入一场梦境:可怕的绷带,吓人的气味。孩子,那才是战争的真实写照:没有军号,也没有战旗。有的只是痛苦和污秽,无益与死亡。”

在贝蒂?范?米特眼里,这个伤兵不是敌人,而是一个受苦受难的人。她给他水喝,并设法擦净他那可怕的伤口。然后她走出农舍,到外面呼吸一点清凉的空气,她倚在屋旁,想到她所见到的这一切——他那只打烂的右手,那条失去的左腿,真是恶心难忍。

贝蒂在顶楼上找到的伤兵的证件,证实他的身份是第十一佛蒙特志愿军D连中尉亨利?比德尔,30岁。她知道应该把这个联邦政府军官的情况向南方邦联的军队报告,可是她也明白

她不会那样做。她是这样向我解释的:“我一直在想,他是不是在什么地方有一位妻子,等着他,盼着他,可又毫无音信——就像我一样。在我看来,唯一重要的事是让她的丈夫重新田到她的身旁。”

詹姆斯?范?米特的妻子慢慢地、耐心地、巧妙地.点燃了亨利?比德尔身上奄奄一息的生命火花。要说药品,她几乎没有。而她又不肯从南方邦联医院里极少的一点医药用品里去拿。但她尽其所有作了一切努力。

当比德尔的体力有所恢复时,他向贝蒂叙说了他在佛蒙特韦斯菲尔德的妻子和子女的J晴况。当贝蒂讲起她的兄弟和詹姆斯时,比德尔也仔细倾听着。贝蒂姨婆总是跟我讲,“我知道他的妻子一定在为他祈祷,就像我为詹姆斯祈祷一样。真奇怪,我和她的感情多么接近。” 山谷地带,10月的夜晚变得越来越冷。比德尔的伤田感染突然加剧。在迪克和他妻子詹尼的帮助下,贝蒂趁黑夜将这位联邦政府军官搬到她自家暖和的厨房上面的一个不易发现的阁楼上。

但在第二天,比德尔发起高烧。贝蒂明白她必须求人帮助,否则他将会死去,因此找到她的家庭医生,多年的朋友格雷厄姆?奥斯本。

奥斯本医生为比德尔作了检查,然后摇摇头说,希望甚微,除非能弄到合适的药品。 “那好,”贝蒂说。“我到哈珀斯渡口北方军那儿去弄!”

医生说她想必疯了。联邦政府军的司令部在将近⒛英里之外,即使找到了北方军,他们也决不会相信她的话。

“我把证据带去,”贝蒂说。她到阁楼上取下一份血迹斑斑的文件,上面盖着陆军部的官印。“这是他最后一次晋升的记录,”她说。“我让他们看这个,他们一定会相信我。” 她叫医生写下所需药品的清单。次日一早,她就登程赶路。

她驱车5个小时,马要休息时,她才停一停。当她终于到达哈珀斯渡口,找到司令官的时候,太阳都快落山了。

约翰?D?史蒂文森将军听了她的叙述,但不信她的话。他说,“夫人,我们已接到比德尔阵亡的报告。”

“他还活着,”贝蒂坚持说。“不过,除非他得到单子上的药品,否则他就活不了多久了。” “好吧,”将军最后说,“我不想为了搞清这r点事,而拿一个巡逻队的生命去冒险。”他转向一个下级军官说,“你负责让范?米特太太得到这些药品。”他对贝蒂的感谢并没有怎么理会,却说道,“不管你讲的是真是假,你是一位勇敢的女性。”

有了贝蒂带回贝利维尔的药品,奥斯本医生才将比德尔从垂危之中拯救了过来。10天之后,比德尔就能拄着迪克为他制作的拐杖一瘸一拐地行走了。“我不能再这样连累你了,”比德尔对贝蒂说道,“我现在身体已经够好了,可以走了。我想尽早回去。”

于是,他们作了安排,由贝蒂的邻居和朋友萨姆先生用他的运货马车协助贝蒂将比德尔送交驻守在哈珀斯渡口的联邦政府军司令部。

他们将贝蒂的马和萨姆先生的骡一起套上车。比德尔躺在一个装满干草的旧木箱内,他将步枪和拐杖放在身边。

行程迟缓而漫长,差一点以灾难而告终。在离联邦政府军防线仅有1小时的路程时,突然出现了两个骑马的人。一个人举着手枪,逼着要钱。另一人将萨姆从车上拉了下来,贝蒂吓呆了,坐着一动不动。就在这时,一声枪响,拿手枪的歹徒应声倒地身亡。又一声枪响,另一个歹徒也躺倒地上。是比德尔开的枪!贝蒂看着他放下步枪,掸掉头发里的干草。“上车吧,萨姆先生,”他说道,“我们赶路吧!”

在哈珀斯渡口,士兵们惊奇地盯着这位老农民和这位年轻的女子看。当缺了一条腿的联邦政府军官从装着干草的木箱里站起来时,他们更是惊愕不已。

比德尔被派去华盛顿。在华盛顿,他把情况向陆军部长埃德温?M?斯坦顿作了汇报。斯坦顿

给贝蒂写了一封感谢信,并签署了一项将詹姆斯?范?米特从战俘营释放的命令。可是首先必须找到詹姆斯。经过安排,由比德尔陪同贝蒂寻找她的丈夫。

有文件记载,有个叫詹姆斯?范?米特的曾被送到俄亥俄的一个战俘营。可是当那些衣衫褴褛的俘虏们被带到贝蒂面前时,詹姆斯却不在里面。又查了一个俘虏营,结果也是一样。贝蒂?范?米特拼命抑制着一种令人战栗不已的恐惧感,她担心她的丈夫已经死去了。

后来在特拉华堡,在靠近一排战俘的末尾处,一个高高个子的人从队伍里走了出来,蹒跚着扑到贝蒂怀里。贝蒂拥抱着他,泪流满面。拄着拐杖站立一旁的亨利?比德尔也流泪了。 "I never did hate the Yankees. All that I hated was the war... "

That's how my great-aunt Bettie began her story. I heard it many

times as a child, whenever my family visited Aunt Bettie in the old house in

Berryville, Virginia. Aunt Bettie was almost 80 years old then. But I could

picture her as she was in the story she told me- barely 20, pretty, with

bright blue eyes.

Bettie Van Metre had good reason to hate the Civil War. One of her

brothers was killed at Gettysburg, another taken prisoner. Then her young

husband, James, a Confederate officer, was captured and sent to an un-

known prison camp somewhere.

One hot day in late September Dick Runner, a former slave, came

to Bettie with a strange report. He had been checking a farmhouse half

a mile away from the Van Metre home, a farmhouse he thought was

empty. But inside, he heard low groans. Following them to the attic,

he found a wounded Union soldier, with a rifle at his side.

When Aunt Bettie told me about her first sight of the bearded man in

the stained blue uniform, she always used the same words. "It was like

walking into a nightmare : those awful bandages, that dreadful smell.

That's what war is really like, child: no bugles and banners. Just pain and

filth, futility and death. "

To Bettie Van Metre this man was not an enemy but rather a suffering

human being. She gave him water and tried to clean his terrible wounds.

Then she went out into the cool air and leaned against the house, trying

not to be sick as she thought of what she had seen-that smashed right

hand, that missing left leg.

The man's papers Bettie found in the attic established his identity: Lt.

Hey Bedell, Company D, North Vermont Volunteers, 30 years old. She

knew that she should report the, presence of this Union officer to the Con-

federate army. But she also knew that she would not do it. This is how she

explained it to me: "I kept wondering if he had a wife somewhere, wait-

ing, and hoping, and not knowing- just as I was. It seemed to me that

the only thing that mattered was to get her husband back to her. "