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希拉里的英文

时间:2016-04-16 来源:唯才教育网 本文已影响

篇一:希拉里演讲中英文

NEW YORK SENATE RACE SPEECH

in Pindars Corner on Pat and Liz Moynihan’s beautiful farm and 2)3)You came out and said that issues and ideals matter. Jobs matter, downstate and upstate. Health care matters, education matters, the environment matters, Social Security matters, a woman’s right to choose matters. It all matters ossibility of what we could do together for our children and for our future here in this state and in our nation.

I will, I will do everything I can to be worthy of your faith and trust and to honor the powerful example of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. I would like all of you and the countless New Yorkers and Americans watchinghis 4)incredible half century of service to New York and our nation. Senator Moynihan, on behalf of New York and America, thank you.

I promise you tonight that I will reach across party lines to bring progress for all of New York’s families. Today we voted as Democrats and Republicans. Tomorrow we begin again as New Yorkers.

5)6)

Tier, from Brooklyn to Buffalo, from Montauk to Massena, from the 7)world’s tallest skyscrapers to breathtaking mountain ranges, I’ve met people whose faces and stories I will never forget. Thousands of New Yorkers from all 62 counties welcomed me into your schools, your local 8)diners, your factory floors, your living rooms and front 9)porches. You taught me, you tested me and you shared with me your challenges and concerns-about overcrowded or crumbling schools, about the struggle to care for growing children and aging parents, about the continuing challenge of providing equal opportunity for all and about children moving away from their home towns because good jobs are so hard to find in upstate New York. Now I’ve worked on issues like these for a long time, some of them for 30 years, and You see, I believe our nation 10)owes every responsible citizen and every responsible family the tools that they need to make the most of their own lives. That’s the basic bargain. I’ll do my best to honor in the United States Senate.

And to those of you who did not support me, I want you to know that I will work in the Senate for you and for all New Yorkers. 11)

竞选纽约参议员的演讲

希拉里.克林顿

大家知道,我们是在七月的一个阳光灿烂的早上,从帕特和丽兹·莫伊尼汉的美丽农场的宾德角开始迈出了这艰难的一步,然后辗转六十二个县,历经过十六个月、三场辩论,打败了两个竞争对手,穿破六套黑色便服。终于在你们的支持下,我们站在了这里。

你们说的这些事情和观念非常重要--全州的就业问题是重要的,保健是重要的,教育是重要的,环境是重要的,社会保险是重要的,还有妇女选择权是重要的。这些全都重要,而我只想衷心道一声:谢谢你,纽约!

感谢你们敞开心扉,感谢你们看到了这可能性--我们将一起为后代、为我们纽约以至全国的将来而共同努力。我对你们每个人都深怀谢意,感谢你们给了我一个为大家服务的机会。

我将以参议员丹尼尔·帕特里克·莫伊尼汉为榜样,尽自己最大的努力不负众望。我希望你们每个人、诸位纽约市民和美国观众,和我一起共同感谢他这50年来为纽约和美国做出了巨大贡献。莫伊尼汉议员:我代表纽约和美国,感谢你。

今晚我发誓,我将跨越两党的界限为全纽约的家庭创造繁荣进步。今天,我们是作为民主党人和共和党人来投票选举;明天,我们将作为纽约人重新开始。 能生活在我国最丰富多彩、最生气勃勃的一个州,我们是多么的幸运。大家知道,从布朗克斯以南到纽约最南端,从布鲁克林到布法罗,从蒙特哥到麦锡纳,从世界最高的摩天大楼到令人叹为观止的山脉,我遇见了一些人,他们的容貌和故事,我永远也不会忘记。六十二个县的成千上万的纽约人把我迎进了你们的学校、你们的风味小餐馆、你们的工厂、你们的起居室和前廊。你们教导着我,你们测试着我,你们把面临的难题和关心的问题告诉我--学校的拥挤和喧闹,养育孩子和赡养年迈双亲的艰辛,寻求人人同等待遇的挑战,还有在纽约州北部地区因为就业机会难寻,孩子们都离开故乡、移往他处的问题。长期以来,我一直在为这些问题而奔忙,有些问题甚至已经忙了有30年,我决心让这些问题得到改观。

大家知道,我们国家有义务让每个负责任的公民和家庭的生活更上一层楼。这是最起码的,作为一名参议员,我将尽自己最大的努力来实现它。

对于那些在过去没有支持我的人们,我想告诉你们,我将在参议院为你们、为全体纽约人而工作。对于那些勤奋工作、甚至在最艰难的时期也不放弃信念的人们,我永远感谢你们。

注释:

Pantsuit n.长裤与衣相配成套的便服

Profoundly adv.深深地, 衷心地

Grateful adj.感激的, 感谢的

Diverse adj.不同的, 变化多的

Breathtaking adj.惊人的, 惊险的

Porch n.门廊, 走廊

Aging n.老化, 成熟的过程 v.使变老

Providing conj.倘若

Bargain n.契约, 合同, 成交商品, 便宜货 v.议价 Undying adj.不死的, 永恒的, 不朽的

篇二:杨澜采访希拉里英文稿

MS. YANG: Let's get back to this trip. In your testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, you suggested that U.S. should use smart power to handle international issues. How is that approach, or strategy, reflected in your Asian trip, especially your trip to China?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, it is our goal in the Obama administration to reach out to the rest of the world using every tool at our disposal. I like to talk about the three D's of our foreign policy: defense, diplomacy, development. We want to emphasize, particularly, diplomacy and development. And what I have tried to do in the month that I have had this position is to make clear that we will represent and defend the interests and the security and the values of the United States, but we want to listen. We are different countries and different cultures. China and the United States have very different histories. And we need to understand each other better so that we can find more common ground. And I was encouraged by my talks with your leadership, that there are a number of areas we can work on together. We are constructing, and have agreed, in principle, to a strategic and economic dialogue that will not only include the economic crisis, which is very important, that China and America lead on a recovery, globally, but clean energy and climate change, and more educational exchanges, and people-to-people exchanges, more work on health care, medicine, science. I want to deepen and broaden the connections, not only between government

officials, as important at that is, but between all kinds of Chinese and Americans.

MS. YANG: I know you have just had a dialogue with the Chinese women. Some of them you have known for 11 years. Well, to the younger generation of women, like your daughters, what kind of advice would you like to give to those who aspire to succeed and lead, but could be afraid of failure?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, that's a good way of phrasing the question, because I think that overcoming your fears, whether you're a young woman or a young man, to be willing to take a risk, to try something different, to follow your heart, to pursue your dreams, takes a certain level of courage.And I just try to tell young people who ask me all the time what I think about the best wayorward is to be true to themselves, you know, to listen to their own heart, to do what gives them joy in life, and meaning in their public and professional careers. And I think if you do that, you may change, you may take a different path. But if you can keep focused on what you believe is important, I think that's the best way to proceed.

MS. YANG: You know, former Treasury Secretary Paulson used to champion the U.S.-Sino dialogue in the structure of the Strategic Economic Dialogue. Have you convinced President Obama to let the State Department take back the reigns? And, if so, what kind of new

framework of dialogue are we talking about?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, we are going to have a comprehensive, integrated dialogue. It will be co-chaired by myself and the Treasury Secretary, because I think there was an awareness that our prior engagement at the dialogue level, government-to-government, was very heavily dominated by economic concerns, and by traditional Treasury priorities. They are very important but that is not the only high-level dialogue that needs to occur. So, we have always had a lot of interaction at many levels of our governments. But what we want to do is to integrate those, and to have our two Presidents, when they meet at the G-20 summit in April, announce the mechanism that we will be pursuing now.

MS. YANG: Have you found the terminology to define the relationship between our two countries? Because under your husband's administration we called it "constructive strategic partnership," and then, in the Bush administration we called it "stakeholders." Have you found the new words yet?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, I'm not as interested in the words as in the actions. I think that we have evolved dramatically in our relationship over the 30 years that we have had diplomatic relations. China has grown just exponentially in a way that is a real tribute to the people of China. But what we now need to do is demonstrate that the United

States and China can work productively together, not only on those issues that we have bilateral concerns over, but to show leadership to the rest of the world. If you just take two major issues confronting the world, I don't think it's realistic to expect that we will see global recovery without Chinese and American cooperation and leadership. I know that it is not realistic to expect that we can deal with global climate change without the United States and China working together. So, what we are talking about is very concrete and specific. It is not so much the description, as the reality and the content of what we will do together that we're focusing on.

MS. YANG: Okay. You quoted Chinese story, (speaks Chinese), which means, "We are in the same boat" to tackle economic crisis.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Yes.

MS. YANG: Yet, at the same time, the "Buy American" rhetoric triggered another round of fear of protectionism. How would the U.S. government reconcile the international responsibility with the demand of domestic constituencies?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, President Obama was very quick to act, and to make clear that we are not going to engage in protectionism. And, with respect to the provision that was in the stimulus package, it must be compliant with our international agreements. We know that a round of protectionism is not in America's interests. It's important that we work

with countries like China, and others, to establish a framework for renewed economic growth and prosperity. Now, we also have work to do at home. Not only do we have to stimulate our economy, but we have to be working to enhance our manufacturing base, work on our automobile industry. So we have a lot of internal decision-making that is important to our economic future. And I think China does, too. mean, China is stimulating your economy at the central government level. You are looking to deal with problems like migrant workers who no longer have jobs. So, we each have our own internal domestic challenges. But we cannot solve those at the expense of generating global growth again, which will benefit both of our people.

MS. YANG: Do you think that China should further invest into American treasury bonds? Because there is a debate here - with unclear future, we should stop buying more.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, I certainly do think that the Chinese government and the central bank here in China is making a very smart decision by continuing to invest in treasury bonds for two reasons.First, because it's a good investment. It's a safe investment. Even despite the economic challenges sweeping over the world, the United States has a well-deserved financial stability reputation. And, secondly, because our economies are so intertwined. The Chinese know that, in order to start exporting again to its biggest market, namely, the United States, the

篇三:杨澜专访希拉里中英文本翻译对照

杨澜访谈录——专访希拉里 中英双语版 (前面英文,后有中文对照) ——————————————————————————————————————— Dragon TV Interview: Developing a Comprehensive, Integrated Dialogue With China Hillary Rodham Clinton

Secretary of State

Interview With Yang Lan of Dragon TV

Beijing, China

February 22, 2009

——————————————————————————————————————— MS. YANG: But this is a beautiful Embassy.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Isn't it? I am so proud and impressed by it. It took a long time to build,

but it is very beautiful and very functional. And the architecture is

Chinese-inspired, so it's really a wonderful addition to our embassy

community.

MS. YANG: And so you are going back today, right?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Yes. I have to go back today.

MS. YANG: And just in time to celebrate your daughter's 29th birthday.

SECRETARY CLINTON: That's true. She will be 29 on Friday. And I am very much looking

forward to seeing her for a birthday dinner.

MS. YANG: Okay. So what kind of path do you like to see her take? I know she has been studying

health policy and management at Columbia.

SECRETARY CLINTON: That's right. I think she is someone who charts her own path, and I am

very impressed and delighted at the choices that she has made. I just,

like most mothers, want her to be happy and have a good life. And that

is really all I wish for her.

MS. YANG: Does she resemble you in the ways that she does things?

SECRETARY CLINTON: I think she is a good combination of both her father and me. She has a

very wonderful personality, and she is a hard worker, and she is a good

friend and a caring person. So I am just very happy to be her mother.

MS. YANG: I know you have just had a dialogue with the Chinese women. Some of them you have known for 11 years. Well, to the younger generation of women, like your daughters, what kind of advice would you like to give to those who aspire to succeed and lead, but could be afraid of failure?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, that's a good way of phrasing the question, because I think that overcoming your fears, whether you're a young woman or a young man, to be willing to take a risk, to try something different, to follow your heart, to pursue your dreams, takes a certain level of courage.

And I just try to tell young people who ask me all the time what I think about the best way

forward is to be true to themselves, you know, to listen to their own heart, to do what gives them joy in life, and meaning in their public and professional careers. And I think if you do that, you may change, you may take a different path. But if you can keep focused on what you believe is important, I think that's the best way to proceed.

MS. YANG: Let's get back to this trip. In your testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, you suggested that U.S. should use smart power to handle international issues. How is that approach, or strategy, reflected in your Asian trip, especially your trip to China?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, it is our goal in the Obama administration to reach out to the rest of the world using every tool at our disposal. I like to talk about the three D's of our foreign policy: defense, diplomacy, development.

We want to emphasize, particularly, diplomacy and development. And what I have tried to do in the month that I have had this position is to make clear that we will represent and defend the interests and the security and the values of the United States, but we want to listen.

We are different countries and different cultures. China and the United States have very different histories. And we need to understand each other better so that we can find more common ground. And I was encouraged by my talks with your leadership, that there are a number of areas we can work on together.

We are constructing, and have agreed, in principle, to a strategic and economic dialogue that will not only include the economic crisis, which is very important, that China and America lead on a recovery, globally, but clean energy and climate change, and more educational exchanges, and people-to-people exchanges, more work on health care, medicine, science.

I want to deepen and broaden the connections, not only between government officials, as important at that is, but between all kinds of Chinese and Americans.

MS. YANG: You know, former Treasury Secretary Paulson used to champion the U.S.-Sino dialogue in the structure of the Strategic Economic Dialogue. Have you convinced President Obama to let the State Department take back the reigns? And, if so, what kind of new framework of dialogue are we talking about?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, we are going to have a comprehensive, integrated dialogue. It will be co-chaired by myself and the Treasury Secretary, because I think there was an awareness that our prior engagement at the dialogue level, government-to-government, was very heavily dominated by economic concerns, and by traditional Treasury priorities. They are very important but that is not the only high-level dialogue that needs to occur.

So, we have always had a lot of interaction at many levels of our governments. But what we want to do is to integrate those, and to have our two Presidents, when they meet at the G-20 summit in April, announce the mechanism that we will be pursuing now.

MS. YANG: Have you found the terminology to define the relationship between our two countries? Because under your husband's administration we called it "constructive strategic partnership," and then, in the Bush administration we called it "stakeholders." Have you found the new words yet?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, I'm not as interested in the words as in the actions. I think that we have evolved dramatically in our relationship over the 30 years that we have had diplomatic relations. China has grown just exponentially in a way that is a real tribute to the people of China.

But what we now need to do is demonstrate that the United States and China can work productively together, not only on those issues that we have bilateral concerns over, but to show leadership to the rest of the world.

If you just take two major issues confronting the world, I don't think it's realistic to expect that we will see global recovery without Chinese and American cooperation and leadership. I know that it is not realistic to expect that we can deal with global climate change without the United States and China working together.

So, what we are talking about is very concrete and specific. It is not so much the description, as the reality and the content of what we will do together that we're focusing on.

MS. YANG: Okay. You quoted Chinese story, (speaks Chinese), which means, "We are in the same boat" to tackle economic crisis.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Yes.

MS. YANG: Yet, at the same time, the "Buy American" rhetoric triggered another round of fear of protectionism. How would the U.S. government reconcile the international responsibility with the demand of domestic constituencies?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, President Obama was very quick to act, and to make clear that we are not going to engage in protectionism. And, with respect to the provision that was in the stimulus package, it must be compliant with our international agreements.

We know that a round of protectionism is not in America's interests. It's important that we work with countries like China, and others, to establish a framework for renewed economic growth and prosperity.

Now, we also have work to do at home. Not only do we have to stimulate our economy, but we have to be working to enhance our manufacturing base, work on our automobile industry. So we have a lot of internal decision-making that is important to our economic future. And I think China does, too. mean, China is stimulating your economy at the central government level. You are looking to deal with problems like migrant workers who no longer have jobs.

So, we each have our own internal domestic challenges. But we cannot solve those at the expense of generating global growth again, which will benefit both of our people.

MS. YANG: You certainly have your hands full, with all sorts of challenges and problems around the world, from Iraq to Gaza Strip, from nuclear proliferation to climate change. And then, of course, the economic crisis.

How would you set an achievable target for your term, as secretary of state?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, it's true, that we have come into office at a time of so many problems. You mentioned a few of the most well known. I don't know that we can pick and choose. It's one of the reasons why I have advocated the appointment of special envoys, because I think we need, as they say, all hands on deck. Everyone has to work hard together to try to untangle some of these problems, to look for solutions where possible.

So, I don't have the luxury of saying, "I will only work on this." I have to be very conscious of everything going on in the world. But I did choose to come, for my first trip, to Asia, because I want to send a clear message that the United States is both a trans-Pacific, as well as a trans-Atlantic power, and that much of what we see as the potential for positive growth and good relations in the 21st century will come with Asian countries like China.

MS. YANG: Thank you very much for your time, although it falls short of my questions. Well, can I squeeze just one more?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Sure.

MS. YANG: Do you think that China should further invest into American treasury bonds? Because there is a debate here - with unclear future, we should stop buying more.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Well, I certainly do think that the Chinese government and the central bank here in China is making a very smart decision by continuing to invest in treasury bonds for two reasons.

First, because it's a good investment. It's a safe investment. Even despite the economic challenges sweeping over the world, the United States has a well-deserved financial stability reputation.

And, secondly, because our economies are so intertwined. The Chinese know that, in order to start exporting again to its biggest market, namely, the United States, the United States has to take some very drastic measures with this stimulus package, which means we have to incur more debt.

It would not be in China's inter(来自:www.Hn1c.cOm 唯 才教 育网:希拉里的英文)est if we were unable to get our economy moving again. So, by continuing to support American treasury instruments, the Chinese are recognizing our interconnection. We are truly going to rise or fall together. We are in the same boat. And, thankfully, we are rowing in the same direction, toward landfall.

MS. YANG: Okay. So we have to keep rowing?

SECRETARY CLINTON: Yes.

MS. YANG: Thank you very much, Secretary Clinton.

SECRETARY CLINTON: Thank you.

美国国务卿希拉里·克林顿把此次访华唯一一个电视专访的机会给了《杨澜访谈录》让我们深感荣幸。不管是因为作为奥巴马政府对中美两国态度的“表态”,还是应对当今全球共同面对的金融危机,希拉里的来访都足够让人瞩目。

采访地点定在美国大使馆。路上我们感受着北京春天阳光的温和,相信今天的采访也会和这早春的阳光一样暖融融。美国大使馆是北京使馆区最新的“一份子”,设计中体现了中国的元素。当希拉里一身藏蓝色西服、配着别致的饰品,在众多随从官员的陪伴下出现在我们视野中的时候,现场的人体会到一种朝气勃发。

第一次采访希拉里,但并不是第一次见到希拉里。与1998年她作为第一夫人跟从肯林顿总统访华的时期相比,今天的希拉里显得更加轻松,这恐怕是自信程度的不同吧!当我见到她本人向她提到这一印象时,希拉里爽朗的笑笑说:“也许是因为我够老了吧!”

采访时间:7分钟

为了平衡中外媒体的采访要求,希拉里的新闻官给《杨澜访谈录》安排了7分钟的采访时间。7分钟,我们以秒计时。顺利的是,我们的问题都得到了希拉里的回答。在我与希拉

里谈兴正浓的时候,一直陪在希拉里旁边的新闻官示意栏目组时间到了。但是作为一个记者,我怎么能够放弃这个机会,在最后时刻我又及时提出了一两个问题。希拉里听到后,对她的新闻官欣然摆了摆手,说:“不,我愿意回答这些问题。”就这样,在希拉里的帮助下我们的采访时间从7分钟延长到10多分钟。

采访结束后,希拉里邀请我们有机会去美国再对她进行采访,那样会有更充裕的时间。

我与希拉里同为母亲

“切尔西是个有主见的人”

切尔西-克林顿现在就读于哥伦比亚大学,主修卫生政策和管理。

“你希望她朝什么方向发展?”我问到。希拉里说:“我觉得她是很有主见的人,我对她自己的选择都很支持。就像大多数母亲一样,我只要她高兴就好,希望她生活得好,我只要求这些。”