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年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语二

时间:2016-10-01 来源:唯才教育网 本文已影响

篇一:2016年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)真题试题

2016年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)试题

Section I Use of English

Directions:

Read the following text. Choose the best word(s) for each numbered blank and mark A, B, C or D on the ANSWER SHEET. (10 points)

Happy people work differently. They’re more productive, more creative, and willing to firms work,too.

Companies located in place with happier people invest more, according to a recent

’s for the future.

The researchers wanted to know if the cities’averagefirms in those areas.

enough, firms’ investment and R&D intensity were correlated with the happiness of ’s linked to investment,or could to live in, like growth in accounting for these things.

The correlation between happiness and investment was particularly strong for younger ―less confined decision making process‖ and the possible sentiment.’’TFirms seem to invest more in places.

n’t prove that happiness causes firms to invest more or to take a longer-term ’s not hard to imagine that local plausible that happy people would be more forward –than the average,‖ said one researcher. 1. [A] why[B] where[C] how[D] when 2. [A] In return

[B] In particular

[C] In contrast

[D] In conclusion

3. [A] sufficient 5. [A] echo 7. [A] sure 8. [A] advertised 9. [A] explain 10. [A] stages 11. [A] desirable 12. [A] resumed 13. [A] attribute 14. [A] serious 15. [A] thus16. [A] rapidly 17. [A] After 18. [A] arrives 19. [A] shape

[B] famous [B] miss[B] odd [B] divided [B] factors [B] held [B] assign [B] instead [B] Until [B] jumps

[C] perfect [C] spoil

[D] necessary [D] realism [D] change [D] assumed [D] often [D] headquartered [D] emphasize [D] methods [D] reliable [D] broke [D] compare [D] experienced [D] never [D] equally [D] Since [D] strikes [D] share [D] send act

4. [A] individualism 6. [A] imagined

[B] modernism [B] measured

[C] optimism [C] invented [C] unfortunate [C] overtaxed [C] summarize [C] levels

[C] reputable [C] emerged [C] transfer [C] also [C] directly [C] While [C] hints

[C] ambitious

[B] overstate [B] sociable

[B] civilized [B] regularly

[B] rediscover [B] lean towards

[C] simplify [C] give away

20. [A] pray for

Section II Reading Comprehension

Part A

Directions:

Read the following four texts. Answer the questions below each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on the ANSWER SHEET. (40 points)

Text 1

It’s true that high-school coding classes aren’t essential for learning computer science in college. Students without experience can catch up after a few introductory courses, said Tom Cortina, the assistant dean at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science.

However, Cortina said, early exposure is beneficial. When younger kids learn computer science, they learn that it’s not just a confusing, endless string of letters and numbers – but a tool to build apps, or create artwork, or test hypotheses. It’s not as hard for them to transform their thought processes as it is for older students. Breaking down problems into bite-sized chunks and using code to solve them becomes normal. Giving more children this training could increase the number of people interested in the field and help fill the jobs gap, Cortina

said.

Students also benefit from learning something about coding before they get to college, where introductory computer-science classes are packed to the brim, which can drive the less-experienced or-determined students away.

The Flatiron School, where people pay to learn programming, started as one of the many coding bootcamps that’s become popular for adults looking for a career change. The high-schoolers get the same curriculum, but ―we try to gear lessons toward things they’re interested in,‖ said Victoria Friedman, an instructor. For instance, one of the apps the students are developing suggests movies based on your mood.

The students in the Flatiron class probably won’t drop out of high school and build the next Facebook. Programming languages have a quick turnover, so the ―Ruby on Rails‖ language they learned may not even be relevant by the time they enter the job market. But the skills they learn – how to think logically through a problem and organize the results – apply to any coding language, said Deborah Seehorn, an education consultant for the state of North Carolina.

Indeed, the Flatiron students might not go into IT at all. But creating a future army of coders is not the sole purpose of the classes. These kids are going to be surrounded by computers-in their pockets ,in their offices, in their homes –for the rest of their lives, The want –the earlier they learn that they have the power to do that –the better.

21.Cortina holds that early exposure to computer science makes it easier to _______ A. complete future job training B. remodel the way of thinking C. formulate logical hypotheses D. perfect artwork production

22.In delivering lessons for high - schoolers , Flatiron has considered their________ A. experience B. interest

C. career prospects

D. academic backgrounds

23.Deborah Seehorn believes that the skills learned at Flatiron will ________ A .help students learn other computer languages

B .have to be upgraded when new technologies come C .need improving when students look for jobs D. enable students to make big quick money

24.According to the last paragraph, Flatiron students are expected to ______

A. bring forth innovative computer technologies B. stay longer in the information technology industry C. become better prepared for the digitalized world D. compete with a future army of programmers

25.The word ―coax‖(Line4,Para.6) is closest in meaning to ________ A. persuade B. frighten C. misguide D. challenge

Text 2

Biologists estimate that as many as 2 million lesser prairie chickens---a kind of bird living on stretching grasslands—once lent red to the often grey landscape of the midwestern and southwestern United States. But just some 22,000 birds remain today, occupying about 16% of the species 'historic range.

The crash was a major reason the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)decided to formally list the bird as threatened .“The lesser prairie chicken is in a desperate situation ,”said USFWS Director Daniel Ashe. Some environmentalists, however,were disappointed. They had pushed the agency to designate the bird as ―endangered,‖a status that gives federal officials greater regulatory power to crack down on threats .But Ashe and others argued that the‖ threatened‖ tag gave the federal government flexibility to try out new,potentially less confrontational conservations approaches.In particular, they called for forging closer collaborations with western state governments, which are often uneasy with federal action. and with the private landowners who control an estimated 95% of the prairie chicken's habitat.

Under the plan, for example,the agency said it would not prosecute landowner or businesses that unintentionally kill, harm, or disturb the bird,as long as they had signed a range—wide management plan to restore prairie chicken habitat. Negotiated byUSFWS and the states, the plan requires individuals and businesses that damage habitat as part of their operations to pay into a fund to replace every acre destroyed with 2 new acresof suitable habitat .The fund will also be used to compensate landowners who set aside habitat ,USFWS also set an interim goal of restoring prairie chicken populations to an annual average of 67,000 birds over the next 10 years .And it gives the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA),a coalition of state agencies, the job of monitoring progress. Overall, the idea is to let ―states‖ remain in the driver 's seat for managing the species,‖ Ashe said.

Not everyone buys the win-win rhetoric.Some Congress members are trying to block the plan,and at least a dozen industry groups,four states,and three environmental groups are challenging it in federal court.Not surprisingly,doesn’t go far enough. ―The federal government is giving responsibility for managing the bird to the same industries that are

pushing it to extinction,‖says biologist Jay Lininger.

26.The major reason for listing the lesser prairie as threatened is____. [A]its drastically decreased population

[B]the underestimate of the grassland acreage [C]a desperate appeal from some biologists [D]the insistence of private landowners

27.The ―threatened‖tag disappointed some environmentalists in that it_____. [A]was a give-in to governmental pressure [B]would involve fewer agencies in action [C]granted less federal regulatory power [D]went against conservation policies

28.It can be learned from Paragraph3 that unintentional harm-doers will not be prosecuted if they_____.

[A]agree to pay a sum for compensation [B]volunteer to set up an equally big habitat [C]offer to support the WAFWA monitoring job [D]promise to raise funds for USFWS operations

29.According to Ashe,the leading role in managing the species in______. [A]the federal government [B]the wildlife agencies [C]the landowners [D]the states

30.Jay Lininger would most likely support_______. [A]industry groups [B]the win-win rhetoric [C]environmental groups [D]the plan under challenge

Text 3

That everyone's too busy these days is a cliché. But one specific complaint is made especially mournfully: There's never any time to read.

What makes the problem thornier is that the usual time-management techniques don't seem sufficient. The web's full of articles offering tips on making time to read:―Give up TV‖ or ―Carry a book with you at all times.‖ But in my experience, using such methods to free up the odd 30 minutes doesn't work. Sit down to read and the flywheel of work-related thoughts keeps spinning-or else you're so exhausted that a challenging book's the last thing you need. The modern mind, Tim Parks, a novelist and critic, writes, ―is overwhelmingly inclined toward communication…It is not simply that one is interrupted; it is that one is actually

篇二:2016年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)真题及答案

2016年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)真题及答案

(完整版)

(注:以下选项标红加粗为正确答案)

Section I Use of English

Directions:

Read the following text. Choose the best word(s) for each numbered blank and mark A, B, C or D on the ANSWER SHEET. (10 points)

Happy people work differently. They’re more productive, more creative, and willing to firms work,too.

Companies located in place with happier people invest more, according to a recent

’s for the future.

The researchers wanted to know if the cities’averagefirms in those areas.

enough, firms’ investment and R&D intensity were correlated with the happiness of ’s linked to investment,or could to live in, like growth in accounting for these things.

The correlation between happiness and investment was particularly strong for younger ―less confined decision making process‖ and the possible sentiment.’’TFirms seem to invest more in places.

n’t prove that happiness causes firms to invest more or to take a longer-term ’s not hard to imagine that local

plausible that happy people would be more forward –than the average,‖ said one researcher.

1. [A] why

[B] where [B] famous [B] miss[B] odd [B] divided [B] factors [B] held [B] assign [B] instead [B] Until [B] jumps

[C] how [C] perfect [C] spoil

[D] when [D] In conclusion [D] necessary [D] realism [D] change [D] assumed [D] often

[D] headquartered [D] emphasize [D] methods [D] reliable [D] broke [D] compare [D] experienced [D] never [D] equally [D] Since [D] strikes [D] share [D] send act

2. [A] In return 3. [A] sufficient 5. [A] echo 7. [A] sure 8. [A] advertised 9. [A] explain 10. [A] stages 12. [A] resumed 14. [A] serious 15. [A] thus16. [A] rapidly 17. [A] After 18. [A] arrives 19. [A] shape

[B] In particular [B] modernism [B] measured

[C] In contrast [C] optimism [C] invented [C] unfortunate [C] overtaxed [C] summarize [C] levels

[C] reputable [C] emerged [C] transfer [C] also [C] directly [C] While [C] hints

[C] ambitious

4. [A] individualism 6. [A] imagined

[B] overstate [B] sociable

11. [A] desirable 13. [A] attribute

[B] civilized [B] regularly

[B] rediscover [C] simplify [C] give away

20. [A] pray for[B] lean towards

Section II Reading Comprehension

Part A

Directions:

Read the following four texts. Answer the questions below each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on the ANSWER SHEET. (40 points)

Text 1

It’s true that high-school coding classes aren’t essential for learning computer science in college. Students without experience can catch up after a few introductory courses, said Tom Cortina, the assistant dean at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Computer Science.

However, Cortina said, early exposure is beneficial. When younger kids learn computer

science, they learn that it’s not just a confusing, endless string of letters and numbers – but a tool to build apps, or create artwork, or test hypotheses. It’s not as hard for them to transform their thought processes as it is for older students. Breaking down problems into bite-sized chunks and using code to solve them becomes normal. Giving more children this training could increase the number of people interested in the field and help fill the jobs gap, Cortina said.

Students also benefit from learning something about coding before they get to college, where introductory computer-science classes are packed to the brim, which can drive the less-experienced or-determined students away.

The Flatiron School, where people pay to learn programming, started as one of the many coding bootcamps that’s become popular for adults looking for a career change. The high-schoolers get the same curriculum, but ―we try to gear lessons toward things they’re interested in,‖ said Victoria Friedman, an instructor. For instance, one of the apps the students are developing suggests movies based on your mood.

The students in the Flatiron class probably won’t drop out of high school and build the next Facebook. Programming languages have a quick turnover, so the ―Ruby on Rails‖ language they learned may not even be relevant by the time they enter the job market. But the skills they learn – how to think logically through a problem and organize the results – apply to any coding language, said Deborah Seehorn, an education consultant for the state of North Carolina.

Indeed, the Flatiron students might not go into IT at all. But creating a future army of coders is not the sole purpose of the classes. These kids are going to be surrounded by computers-in their pockets ,in their offices, in their homes –for the rest of their lives, The want –the earlier they learn that they have the power to do that –the better.

21.Cortina holds that early exposure to computer science makes it easier to _______ [A]complete future job training [B]remodel the way of thinking [C]formulate logical hypotheses [D]perfect artwork production

22.In delivering lessons for high - schoolers , Flatiron has considered their________ [A]experience [B]interest

[C]career prospects

[D]academic backgrounds

23.Deborah Seehorn believes that the skills learned at Flatiron will ________ [A]help students learn other computer languages

[B] have to be upgraded when new technologies come [C] need improving when students look for jobs [D]enable students to make big quick money

24.According to the last paragraph, Flatiron students are expected to ______ [A] bring forth innovative computer technologies [B]stay longer in the information technology industry [C]become better prepared for the digitalized world [D]compete with a future army of programmers

25.The word ―coax‖(Line4,Para.6) is closest in meaning to ________ [A]persuade [B]frighten [C]misguide [D]challenge

Text 2

Biologists estimate that as many as 2 million lesser prairie chickens---a kind of bird living on stretching grasslands—once lent red to the often grey landscape of the midwestern and southwestern United States. But just some 22,000 birds remain today, occupying about 16% of the species 'historic range.

The crash was a major reason the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)decided to formally list the bird as threatened .“The lesser prairie chicken is in a desperate situation ,‖said USFWS Director Daniel Ashe. Some environmentalists, however,were disappointed. They had pushed the agency to designate the bird as ―endangered,‖a status that gives federal officials greater regulatory power to crack down on threats .But Ashe and others argued that the‖ threatened‖ tag gave the federal government flexibility to try out new,potentially less confrontational conservations approaches.In particular, they called for forging closer collaborations with western state governments, which are often uneasy with federal action. and with the private landowners who control an estimated 95% of the prairie chicken's habitat.

Under the plan, for example,the agency said it would not prosecute landowner or businesses that unintentionally kill, harm, or disturb the bird,as long as they had signed a range—wide management plan to restore prairie chicken habitat. Negotiated byUSFWS and the states, the plan requires individuals and businesses that damage habitat as part of their operations to pay into a fund to replace every acre destroyed with 2 new acresof suitable habitat .The fund will also be used to compensate landowners who set aside habitat ,USFWS also set an interim goal of restoring prairie chicken populations to an annual average of 67,000 birds over the next 10 years .And it gives the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA),a coalition of state agencies, the job of monitoring progress. Overall, the

idea is to let ―states‖ remain in the driver 's seat for managing the species,‖ Ashe said.

Not everyone buys the win-win rhetoric.Some Congress members are trying to block the plan,and at least a dozen industry groups,four states,and three environmental groups are challenging it in federal court.Not surprisingly,doesn’t go far enough. ―The federal government is giving responsibility for managing the bird to the same industries that are pushing it to extinction,‖says biologist Jay Lininger.

26.The major reason for listing the lesser prairie as threatened is____. [A]its drastically decreased population [B]the underestimate of the grassland acreage [C]a desperate appeal from some biologists [D]the insistence of private landowners

27.The ―threatened‖tag disappointed some environmentalists in that it_____. [A]was a give-in to governmental pressure [B]would involve fewer agencies in action [C]granted less federal regulatory power [D]went against conservation policies

28.It can be learned from Paragraph3 that unintentional harm-doers will not be prosecuted if they_____.

[A]agree to pay a sum for compensation

[B]volunteer to set up an equally big habitat [C]offer to support the WAFWA monitoring job [D]promise to raise funds for USFWS operations

29.According to Ashe,the leading role in managing the species in______. [A]the federal government [B]the wildlife agencies [C]the landowners [D]the states

30.Jay Lininger would most likely support_______. [A]industry groups

[B]the win-win rhetoric [C]environmental groups [D]the plan under challenge

Text 3

That everyone's too busy these days is a cliché. But one specific complaint is made especially mournfully: There's never any time to read.

What makes the problem thornier is that the usual time-management techniques don't seem sufficient. The web's full of articles offering tips on making time to read:―Give up TV‖

篇三:2015年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)试题及答案解析

新东方在线考研 [http://kaoyan.koolearn.com ]网络课堂电子教材系列

2015年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语(二)试题

及答案

Section I Use of English

Directions:

Read the following text. Choose the best word(s) for each numbered blank and mark A, B, C or D on ANSWER SHEET 1. (10 points)

In our contemporary culture, the prospect of communicating with — or even looking at — a stranger is virtually unbearable. Everyone around us seems to agree by the way they cling to their phones, even without a on a subway.

It?s a sad reality — our desire to avoid interacting with other human beings — because there?s to be gained from talking to the stranger standing by you. But you wouldn?t know it,

What is it that makes us feel we need to hide our screens?

One answer is fear, according to Jon Wortmann, an executive mental coach. We fear rejection, or that our innocent social advances will be as “weird.” We fear we?ll be . We fear we?ll be disruptive.

Strangers are inherently to us, so we are more likely to feel when communicating with them compared with our friends and acquaintances. To avoid this uneasiness, we to our phones. “Phones become our security blanket,” Wortmann says. “They are our

But once we rip off the band-aid, tuck our smartphones in our pockets and look up, it doesn'tso bad. In one 2011 experiment, behavioral scientists Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder . They had Chicago train commuters talk to their fellow “When Dr. Epley and Ms. Schroeder asked other people in the same train station to how they would feel after talking to a stranger, the commuters thought their would be more pleasant if they sat on their own,” The New York Times summarizes. Though the participants didn't expect a positive experience, after they with the experiment, "not a single person reported having been embarrassed."

, these commutes were reportedly more enjoyable compared with those without communication, which makes absolute sense, human beings thrive off of social

1. [A] ticket [B] permit [C] signal[D] record

2. [A] nothing

3. [A] beaten

[B] little [C] another [D] much [B] guided[C] plugged [D] brought

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4. [A] message [B] code [C] notice[D] sign

5. [A] under[B] beyond[C] behind[D] from

[C] misadjusted [D] mismatched 6. [A] misinterpreted[B] misapplied

7. [A] fired [B] judged

8. [A] ueasonable [B] ungrateful

9. [A] comfortable [B] anxious

10. [A] attend[B] point

11. [A] dangerous [B] mysterious [C] replaced [D] delayed [C] unconventional [D] unfamiliar [C] confident[D] angry [C] take [D] turn [C] violent[D] boring

12. [A] hurt [B] resist [C] bend [D] decay

13. [A] lecture [B] conversation [C] debate [D] negotiation

14. [A] trainees [B] employees[C] researchers [D] passengers

15. [A] reveal[B] choose [C] predict [D] design

16. [A] voyage [B] flight[C] walk[D] ride

17. [A] went through[B] did away[C] caught up [D] put up

18. [A] In turn [B] In particular [C] In fact [D] In consequence

19. [A] unless[B] since [C] if[D] whereas

20. [A] funny[B] simple[C] logical [D] rare

Section II Reading Comprehension

Part A

Directions:

Read the following four texts. Answer the questions below each text by choosing A, B, C or D. Mark your answers on ANSWER SHEET 1. (40 points)

Text 1

A new study suggests that contrary to most surveys, people are actually more stressed at home that at work. Researchers measured people?s cortisol, which is stress marker, while they were at work and while they were at home and found it higher at what is supposed to be a place of refuge.

“Further contradicting conventional wisdom, we found that women as well as men have lower levels of stress at work than at home,” writes one of the researchers, Sarah Damaske. In fact women even say they feel better at work, she notes. “It is men, not women, who report being happier at home than at work.” Another surprise is that the findings hold true for both those with children and without, but more so for nonparents. This is why people who work outside the home have better health.

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What the study doesn?t measure is whether people are still doing work when they?re at home, whether it is household work or work brought home from the office. For many men, the end of the workday is a time to kick back. For women who stay home, they never get to leave the office. And for women who work outside the home, they often are playing catch-up-with-household tasks. With the blurring of roles, and the fact that the home front lags well behind the workplace in making adjustments for working women, it?s not surprising that women are more stressed at home.

But it?s not just a gender thing. At work, people pretty much know what they?re supposed to be doing: working, making money, doing the tasks they have to do in order to draw an income. The bargain is very pure: Employee puts in hours of physical or mental labor and employee draws On the home front, however, people have no such clarity. Rare is the household in which the division of labor is so clinically and methodically laid out. There are a lot of tasks to be done, there are inadequate rewards for most of them. Your home colleagues — your family — have no clear rewards for their labor; they need to be talked into it, or if they?re teenagers, threatened with complete removal of all electronic devices. Plus, they?re your family. You cannot fire your family. You never really get to go home from home.

So it?s not surprising that people are more stressed at home. Not only are the tasks apparently infinite, the co-workers are much harder to motivate.

21. According to Paragraph 1, most previous surveys found that home_______.

[A] was an uealistic place for relaxation

[B] generated more stress than the workplace

[C] was an ideal place for stress measurement

[D] offered greater relaxation than the workplace

22. According to Damaske, who are likely to be the happiest at home?

[A] Working mothers.

[B] Childless husbands.

[C] Childless wives.

[D] Working fathers.

23. The blurring of working women?s roles refers to the fact they_______.

[A] they are both bread winners and housewives

[B] their home is also a place for kicking back

[C] there is often much housework left behind

[D] it is difficult for them to leave their office

24. The word “moola” (Line 4, Para 4) most probably means_______.

[A] energy

[B] skills

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[C] earnings

[D] nutrition

25. The home front differs from the workplace in that_______.

[A] home is hardly a cozier working environment

[B] division of labor at home is seldom clear-cut

[C] household tasks are generally more motivating

[D] family labor is often adequately rewarded

Text 2

For years, studies have found that first-generation college students — those who do not have a parent with a college degree — lag other students on a range of education achievement factors. Their grades are lower and their dropout rates are higher. But since such students are most likely to advance economically if they succeed in higher education, colleges and universities have pushed for decades to recruit more of them. This has created “a paradox” in that recruiting first-generation students, but then watching many of them fail, means that higher education has “continued to reproduce and widen, rather than close” an achievement gap based on social class, according to the depressing beginning of a paper forthcoming in the journal Psychological Science.

But the article is actually quite optimistic, as it outlines a potential solution to this problem, suggesting that an approach (which involves a one-hour, next-to-no-cost program) can close 63 percent of the achievement gap (measured by such factors as grades) between first-generation and other students.

The authors of the paper are from different universities, and their findings are based on a study involving 147 students (who completed the project) at an unnamed private university. First generation was defined as not having a parent with a four-year college degree. Most of the first-generation students (59.1 percent) were recipients of Pell Grants, a federal grant for undergraduates with financial need, while this was true only for 8.6 percent of the students with at least one parent with a four-year degree.

Their thesis — that a relatively modest intervention could have a big impact — was based on the view that first-generation students may be most lacking not in potential but in practical knowledge about how to deal with the issues that face most college students. They cite past research by several authors to show that this is the gap that must be narrowed to close the achievement gap.

Many first-generation students “struggle to navigate the middle-class culture of higher education, learn the ?rules of the game,? and take advantage of college resources,” they write. And this becomes more of a problem when collages don?t talk about the class advantages and disadvantages of different groups of students. “Because US colleges and universities seldom acknowledge how social class can affect students? educational experiences, many first-generation students lack insight about why they are struggling and do not understand how students ?like them? can improve. ”

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26. Recruiting more first-generation students has_______.

[A] reduced their dropout rates

[B] narrowed the achievement gap

[C] missed its original purpose

[D] depressed college students

27. The author of the research article are optimistic because_______.

[A] the problem is solvable

[B] their approach is costless

[C] the recruiting rate has increased

[D] their findings appeal to students

28. The study suggests that most first-generation students______.

[A] study at private universities

[B] are from single-parent families

[C] are in need of financial support

[D] have failed their collage

29. The authors of the paper believe that first-generation students_______.

[A] are actually indifferent to the achievement gap

[B] can have a potential influence on other students

[C] may lack opportunities to apply for research projects

[D] are inexperienced in handling their issues at college

30. We may infer from the last paragraph that__

年全国硕士研究生入学统一考试英语二

_____.

[A] universities often reject the culture of the middle-class

[B] students are usually to blame for their lack of resources

[C] social class greatly helps eich educational experiences

[D] colleges are partly responsible for the problem in question

Text 3

Even in traditional offices, “the lingua franca of corporate America has gotten much more emotional and much more right-brained than it was 20 years ago,” said Harvard Business School professor Nancy Koehn. She started spinning off examples. “If you and I parachuted back to Fortune 500 companies in 1990, we would see much less frequent use of terms like journey, mission, passion. There were goals, there were strategies, there were objectives, but we didn?t talk about energy; we didn?t talk about passion.”

Koehn pointed out that this new era of corporate vocabulary is very “team”-oriented — and not by coincidence. “Let?s not forget sports — in male-dominated corporate America, it?s still a